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Bonner the Stochastic was an Orion novelist from Zeta Orionis.

Spock, while listening to Edith Keeler's sermon, was reminded of Bonner the Stochastic's writings. (TOS novelization: The City on the Edge of Forever)

In 2030, Bonner the Stochastic wrote a classic using the theme "Let me help", recommending these words over "I love you." In 2268, James T. Kirk recalled these words when Spock began exhibiting strange behavior after a meeting with Albar Exar. (TOS episode: "The City on the Edge of Forever", TOS - The New Voyages short story: "Ni Var")

The author was awarded the Nobel Prize at some point during his life. (TOS novel: Vulcan's Forge)

In an alternate timeline, Jonathan Archer recommended this work to T'Pol, who then referred to it in order to convince a Romulan Commander to defect from the Romulan Star Empire. (Star Trek: Myriad Universes novel: A Less Perfect Union)

Bonner the Stochastic was a character who appeared in several novels by James Blish, in addition to his novelization of "City".
In the shooting script for The City on the Edge of Forever, the writer was named Patrick Ko-lu-u-u-nah-meh-eh-eh Taj-na-ah-me.

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