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For other uses, see Dixon.
See Hill for other articles with titles that contain, either by relationship or by coincidence, this character's surname.
Thebiggoodbye

Beverly Crusher (left) and Jean-Luc Picard in the role of Dixon Hill (right).

Dixon Hill was a fictional 20th-century detective of Earth and the lead character in a number of stories and novels in the Dixon Hill series.

History and specificsEdit

Dixon Hill and the Black Orchid, a film based on the character, was included in Enterprise's motion picture library in 2153. (ENT episode: "Cogenitor")

Jean-Luc Picard was fascinated by the "two-fisted gumshoe" from an early age. Following the upgrade of the Enterprise-D holodecks in 2364, he was able to play the character of Dixon Hill, in stories set in San Francisco, California, circa 1941. (TNG episodes: "The Big Goodbye", "Clues"; TNG movie: Star Trek: First Contact)

Many copies of the Dixon Hill adventures were lost in the Eugenics Wars. In the years that followed, librarians were noted to discover 'new' editions of the novels which had been either mislabeled or stored in obscure archives. Jean-Luc Picard instructed his ship's computer to alert him whenever such works had been found and added into the Federation database. (TNG novel: Infiltrator)

When Picard found himself accidentally transported back in time to Cestus III, 2267, he identified himself as "Dixon Hill" to outpost commander Commodore Travers. (TNG novel: Requiem)

In 2368, the Enterprise's holodecks received a systems upgrade and with it a new Dixon Hill adventure, which Picard saved under "Picard Dixon Hill Seven". The upgrades included new smells. Picard invited William T. Riker, Data and Beverly Crusher to test-run it for him, but they were interrupted by the arrival of The Doctor, Amy Pond and Rory Williams. (TNG - Assimilation² comics: "Issue 1", "Issue 2")

In 2372, Picard stated that he learned the trick of hiding a hand phaser under his desk from "a man named Dixon Hill". (TNG eBook: A Sea of Troubles)

Other characters in this genre include Sam Spade, Philip Marlowe, and Nate Heller.

AppendicesEdit

ConnectionsEdit

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