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The Q were a race of beings with god-like abilities; they could make anything they want appear just by snapping their fingers. They generally were humanoid, and took on the appearance of a [[Human]]. Their government is known as the [[Q Continuum]]. For the Q, life has become stagnant and boring for most. They have literally seen and experienced everything. Others of the Q, such as [[Q]], who appears frequently throughout the Star Trek TV Shows [[Star Trek: Voyager]] and [[Star Trek: The Next Generation]], appear to have fun with anything that they deem interesting. One example of this is that in one episode of the Next Generation, when Q was punished and made into a human for causing trouble, an alien known as a [[Calamarain]] came to kill him, due to the fact he tormented their race (TNG: "[[Deja Q]]"). Another Q who had fun with everything was an unnamed female Q who [[Q]] had broken up with before. She had the same routine as her husband; the sarcastic remarks and "superiority complex". All Q were immortal. However, the Q were capable of killing each other, using weapons resembling American Civil War muskets, flintlocks, and cannons. (VOY: "[[The Q and the Grey]]") The Q were also capable of affecting the situation beings are put in. Q once blinked Picard back and forth through time, so he could prevent the destruction of humanity by his own hands. (TNG Novel and Episode: "[[All Good Things...]]") From what we have seen of the Q, their arrogance carries up into their "middle ages" (By human years). Elderly Q have been seen as more docile. One example is the Colonel Q seen in the Civil War state Continuum, who, instead of snapping at [[Kathryn Janeway]], asked for her purpose at the Q pro-tradition camp, in a wise, kind sort of voice, even though Captain Janeway was for the separatist Q. The arrogance half was seen in Q's son as well as himself. (VOY: "[[Q2]]")
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{{Quote|What is a Q?"<br>"It's a letter of the alphabet, as far as I know.|[[Worf, son of Mogh|Worf]] and [[Natasha Yar|Tasha Yar]], [[2364]]|All Good Things...}}
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The '''Q''' were a mysterious race of virtually omnipotent and omniscient "higher-beings" who made up, and were governed by, the [[Q Continuum]].
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The true form of the Q is unknown as their true appearance is regarded as incomprehensible to beings of the three-dimensional universe. ({{e|VOY|Death Wish}})
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To interact with the 3-D realm, the Q presented themselves in the guises of the species they interacted with, and were readily able to change the appearance of their avatars. ({{e|TNG|Encounter at Farpoint|Hide and Q}}, {{c|TOS|sub=The Q Gambit|{{a|The Q Gambit, Part 3|Part 3}}|||||}})
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The exact origin of the Q is equally unknown. [[Quinn]] once implied that the Q had begun their history in a manner similar to the [[Human]]s and [[Vulcan]]s. ({{e|VOY|Death Wish}})
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With [[Q]] even fearing that the humans would one day follow a similar path. ({{e|TNG|Hide and Q}})
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Before later claiming his people had always existed as they were. ({{e|VOY|The Q and the Grey}})
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Though Q once claimed to {{kt|James T. Kirk}} that he could manipulate space/time as easily as Kirk could "change the water in a fishbowl", ({{c|TOS|sub=The Q Gambit|{{a|The Q Gambit, Part 1|Part 1}}|||||}})
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Quinn claimed the Q were not omnipotent, comparing their status to Starfleet to how a primitive society would view the {{USS|Voyager}}, though he did not elaborate on any of his species' limitations. ({{e|VOY|Death Wish}})
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Nonetheless, the Q were powerful enough to teleport across vast distances, "misplace" asteroid belts, collapse galaxies, and even travel outside of the universe. ({{e|TNG|Q Who|Deja Q|True Q}})
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Such was their power that they regarded private planets as toys for their young. ({{e|TOS|The Squire of Gothos}})
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A single Q was able to completely alter the history of two separate universes. ({{c|TOS|sub=Star Trek—Legion of Super-Heroes||}})
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Sufficiently powerful entities could pose threats to the Q however with the forces of [[0]], [[The One]], [[Gorgan]], and [[(*)]], bringing the Q to their knees. The latter two were even able to evade capture by their foes. ({{n|TNG|Q-Strike}})
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Equally, when forced into a war with the [[Pah-wraith]]s, the Q were brought to the brink of defeat, with Q even confessing to Kirk that, in their native dimension, the Q were not the gods they were in the 3-D universe but as mortal as humans. Being at the nexus of the [[Bajoran wormhole]], an interdimensional crossroads, stripped Q of his powers. ({{c|TOS|sub=The Q Gambit|{{a|The Q Gambit, Part 5|Part 5}}|{{a|The Q Gambit, Part 6|Part 6}}||||}})
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Likewise, though they regarded themselves as more powerful than the [[Organian]]s, [[Metron]]s, or even [[Prophets]], all three races proved capable of fighting the Q on equal footing with a war between them projected to last centuries. ({{c|TNG|sub=The Q Conflict|{{a|The Q Conflict, Issue 4|Issue 4}}|{{a|The Q Conflict, Issue 5|Issue 5}}|{{a|The Q Conflict, Issue 6|Issue 6}}}})
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Though seemingly incapable of death, the Q were capable of being killed by weapons forged by their own kind. ({{e|VOY|The Q and the Grey}}, {{c|TNG|sub=The Q Conflict|{{a|The Q Conflict, Issue 6|Issue 6}}||}})
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The Q were also capable of executing rogue members of the Continuum. ({{e|TNG|True Q}})
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Despite interacting with less evolved species across time and space, the Q culture was so heavily stagnant and sterile that by the [[21st century]], Quinn felt he had done and seen literally everything in the universe. ({{e|VOY|Death Wish}})
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When he committed suicide, the first Q to do so, his death sparked the Q Civil War, dividing the species into the conservatives, those that sought to end any interactions with other species, and those who sought to revitalize their society. ({{e|VOY|The Q and the Grey}})
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The Q were capable of granting their power to others. ({{e|TNG|Hide and Q}})
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Readily capable of stripping them away from members of their people. ({{e|TNG|Deja Q}}, {{e|VOY|Death Wish}})
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Likewise, a Q could renounce their powers. ({{e|TNG|Q Who}})
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==Known Q==
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*[[Q]]
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*[[Q2]]
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*[[Female Q]]
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*{{dis|Q|Junior}}
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*{{dis|Q|Colonel}}
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*{{dis|Q|Judge}}
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*[[Quinn]] <small>(formerly; deceased)</small>
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*[[Amanda Rogers]]
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*[[William T. Riker]] <small>(temporarily)</small>
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==External link==
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{{Memoryalpha}}
 
[[Category:Races and cultures]]
 
[[Category:Races and cultures]]
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[[Category:Extradimensional races and cultures]]

Latest revision as of 16:41, February 23, 2020

"What is a Q?"
"It's a letter of the alphabet, as far as I know.
"
Worf and Tasha Yar, 2364[src]

The Q were a mysterious race of virtually omnipotent and omniscient "higher-beings" who made up, and were governed by, the Q Continuum.

The true form of the Q is unknown as their true appearance is regarded as incomprehensible to beings of the three-dimensional universe. (VOY episode: "Death Wish")

To interact with the 3-D realm, the Q presented themselves in the guises of the species they interacted with, and were readily able to change the appearance of their avatars. (TNG episodes: "Encounter at Farpoint", "Hide and Q", TOS - The Q Gambit comic: "Part 3")

The exact origin of the Q is equally unknown. Quinn once implied that the Q had begun their history in a manner similar to the Humans and Vulcans. (VOY episode: "Death Wish")

With Q even fearing that the humans would one day follow a similar path. (TNG episode: "Hide and Q")

Before later claiming his people had always existed as they were. (VOY episode: "The Q and the Grey")

Though Q once claimed to James T. Kirk that he could manipulate space/time as easily as Kirk could "change the water in a fishbowl", (TOS - The Q Gambit comic: "Part 1")

Quinn claimed the Q were not omnipotent, comparing their status to Starfleet to how a primitive society would view the USS Voyager, though he did not elaborate on any of his species' limitations. (VOY episode: "Death Wish")

Nonetheless, the Q were powerful enough to teleport across vast distances, "misplace" asteroid belts, collapse galaxies, and even travel outside of the universe. (TNG episodes: "Q Who", "Deja Q", "True Q")

Such was their power that they regarded private planets as toys for their young. (TOS episode: "The Squire of Gothos")

A single Q was able to completely alter the history of two separate universes. (TOS - Star Trek—Legion of Super-Heroes comic:)

Sufficiently powerful entities could pose threats to the Q however with the forces of 0, The One, Gorgan, and (*), bringing the Q to their knees. The latter two were even able to evade capture by their foes. (TNG novel: Q-Strike)

Equally, when forced into a war with the Pah-wraiths, the Q were brought to the brink of defeat, with Q even confessing to Kirk that, in their native dimension, the Q were not the gods they were in the 3-D universe but as mortal as humans. Being at the nexus of the Bajoran wormhole, an interdimensional crossroads, stripped Q of his powers. (TOS - The Q Gambit comics: "Part 5", "Part 6")

Likewise, though they regarded themselves as more powerful than the Organians, Metrons, or even Prophets, all three races proved capable of fighting the Q on equal footing with a war between them projected to last centuries. (TNG - The Q Conflict comics: "Issue 4", "Issue 5", "Issue 6")

Though seemingly incapable of death, the Q were capable of being killed by weapons forged by their own kind. (VOY episode: "The Q and the Grey", TNG - The Q Conflict comic: "Issue 6")

The Q were also capable of executing rogue members of the Continuum. (TNG episode: "True Q")

Despite interacting with less evolved species across time and space, the Q culture was so heavily stagnant and sterile that by the 21st century, Quinn felt he had done and seen literally everything in the universe. (VOY episode: "Death Wish")

When he committed suicide, the first Q to do so, his death sparked the Q Civil War, dividing the species into the conservatives, those that sought to end any interactions with other species, and those who sought to revitalize their society. (VOY episode: "The Q and the Grey")

The Q were capable of granting their power to others. (TNG episode: "Hide and Q")

Readily capable of stripping them away from members of their people. (TNG episode: "Deja Q", VOY episode: "Death Wish")

Likewise, a Q could renounce their powers. (TNG episode: "Q Who")

Known QEdit

External linkEdit

Q (species) article at Memory Alpha, the wiki for canon Star Trek.

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