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There is [sometimes controvertial] evidence suggesting that [[Star Trek]] as we know it is also known to the denizens of the [[twenty-second century]] onward.
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: ''This article is about "Star Trek" in-universe. For real world information on the franchise, see [[Star Trek]].''
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[[file:LA20-Poster.jpg|thumb|[[James T. Kirk]] and [[Spock]] saw themselves on a ''[[TOS]]'' poster.]]A number of stories have incorporated the real-world '''''Star Trek''''' series into their narratives.
   
[[Star Trek]]'s History may date back to [[1930]]s [[Earth]], where there was a popular [[science fiction]] magazine called [[Captain Proton Magazine]], featuring characters later used often on [[USS Voyager]]'s holodecks.
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=="Far Beyond the Stars"==
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''Star Trek'' was the name given to a series of [[science fiction]] stories created by [[Benny Russell]], a writer for ''[[Incredible Tales of Scientific Wonder]]'' Magazine in the summer of [[1950]]. These tales were set in a fictional world of the [[23rd century|23rd]] and [[24th centuries]]. (''[[DS9]]'' [[novelization]]: ''[[Far Beyond the Stars]]'')
   
''Captain Proton Magazine'' was written by a man called [[Ben Russell]] and featured, besides [[Captain Proton]] himself, [[Buster Kincaid]], Ben Sisko, [[Constance Goodheart]], The Shapechanging [[Founder]], [[Dr. Chaotica]] and soldiers known as [[Jem'Hadar]] (SNW story [[Captain Proton and the Orb of Bajor]].
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In September of [[1953]], Russell wrote his last official ''Star Trek'' story. Titled ''[[Deep Space Nine (novella)|Deep Space Nine]]'', the story was a spin-off centering around a [[space station]] commander of [[Africa]]n descent named [[Benjamin Sisko]]. That issue ceased publication and most were pulled from the shelves by [[Douglas Pabst]], for fear of a backlash of [[racism]] at the magazine. (''[[DS9]]'' [[episode]]: "[[Far Beyond the Stars]]")
   
It is also possible, though not proven, that [[Emma Geller]] was a fan of Russell and, in [[1924]], named her son, Benjamin [[Benny Russell]], after him.
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After suffering from a nervous breakdown, Russell continued writing ''Star Trek'' stories while incarcerated in a [[mental institution]]. These unpublished stories include:
Geller's husband, [Fox Russell]], was barely ever around, so he was okay with the naming.
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*"The Emissary" (April [[1954]])
Russell grew up in [[Harlem]] in [[New York]] and became, in turn, interested in science-fiction (DS9 novelisation [[Far Beyond the Stars]]).
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*"Image in the Sand" (January 18, [[1955]])
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*"Take Me Out to the Holosuite" (February, 1955)
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*"Shadows and Symbols", "Afterimage", "Chrysalis", "Treachery, Faith, and the Great River", "Once More Unto the Breach", "The Siege of AR-558", "Covenant", "It's Only a Paper Moon", "Prodigal Daughter", "The Emperor's New Cloak", "Field of Fire", "Chimera", "Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges", "Badda-bing, Badda-bang", "Penumbra", "'Til Death Do Us Part", "Strange Bedfellows", "The Changing Face of Evil", "When it Rains...", "Tacking into the Wind", "Extreme Measures", "Dogs of War", "What You Leave Behind" (February 17, 1955)
   
By [[1938]], ''Captain Proton'' was a regular fixture on radios across [[America]] (SNW story [[Captain Proton and the Orb of Bajor]]).
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These stories were pasted on his cell walls, covering them entirely. ({{ss|DS9|Isolation Ward 4}})
   
In [[1940]], a book called ''Amazing Stories'' was published, featuring the story ''The Adventures of Captain Proton, Chapter I: The Space Vortex of Doom'' (VGR story [[The Adventures of Captain Proton, Chapter I: The Space Vortex of Doom]]).
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Eventually, Benny Russell's original story was published under the title ''Far Beyond the Stars''. ({{n|TOS|The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, Volume 1}})
   
In April of that year, the book ''Captain Proton! Defender of the Earth'' was published. Benny Russell had a letter printed in this book, in which he expressed his liking of the title character (VGR book [[Captain Proton! Defender of the Earth]]).
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:''Russell's ''Star Trek'' incorporated many elements of ''[[Star Trek: The Original Series]]'' as well as ''[[Star Trek: The Next Generation]]'', perhaps inspired by the [[Prophets]].''
   
In Summer [[1950]], Russell created inhabitants for a story he referred to as ''Star Trek''. These included [[Vulcans]], [[Klingons]], [[Borg]], [[tribbles]] as well as [[James T. Kirk]], [[Nyota Uhura]], [[Jean-Luc Picard]], [[William Riker]], [[Geordi LaForge]] and [[Guinan]] (DS9 novelisation [[Far Beyond the Stars]]).
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The March, [[1953]] issue of ''Incredible Tales'' included the following stories, which may or may not be related to Russell's ''Star Trek'':
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* "[[The Cage]]" by [[Gene Roddenberry|E.W. Roddenberry]]
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* "[[The Corbomite Maneuver]]" by [[Jerry Sohl]]
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* "[[Journey to Babel]]" by [[D.C. Fontana]]
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* "[[{{ed|Metamorphosis}}]]" by [[Gene L. Coon]]
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* "[[Where No Man Has Gone Before]]" by [[Sam Peeples]]
   
The magazine Russell worked for - ''Incredible Tales of Scientific Wonder'' - sold well in March [[1953]], with the story by [[E.W. Roddenberry]] called [[The Cage]], [[Jerry Sohl]]'s novella [[The Corbomite Maneuver]], [[D.C. Fontana]]'s [[Journey to Babel]], [[Gene L. Coon]]'s [[Metamorphosis]] and [[Sam Peeples]]' [[Where No Man has gone Before]] (DS9 episode [[Far Beyond the Stars]]).
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({{e|DS9|Far Beyond the Stars}}):
   
Unfortunately, Russell's interest in stories reached a peak in September that year, when he created a story called [[Deep Space Nine]], a direct branch of his earlier ''Star Trek'' stories. These featured space station commander [[Benjamin Sisko]], a black man. Although that issue included other stories by other writers as well, Russell's editor [[Douglas Pabst]] chose not to publish that month's edition and had - apparently - every edition pulped (DS9 episode and novelisation [[Far Beyond the Stars]]).
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=="Research"==
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In [[1964]], television writer [[Gene Roddenberry]] met time travelers [[J. R. Rasmussen|J. R.]] and [[Berlinghoff Rasmussen]], who shared with him knowledge of the future. He used this to write the [[television]] incarnation of ''Star Trek''.
   
Not all copies got pulped, though. At least one was found on December 27 of 1953, by psychiatrist [[James Wykoff]]'s son, and acted out (SNW story [[Isolation Ward 4]]).
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J. R. and Berlinghoff Rasmussen later traveled to the [[1980s]], and used their future knowledge to provide [[Paramount]] executives with material for three ''Star Trek'' spin-offs well into the [[1990s]]. Some time after Berlinghoff's death in [[1999]], J. R. left the television ''Star Trek'' franchise. ({{ss|DS9|Research}})
   
Incarcerated in a mental institute, Russell refused to stop writing ''Star Trek: Deep Space Nine'' stories, and he wrote ''The Emissary'' sometime in very late April [[1954]]. He then wrote ''Image in the Sand'' on January 18, ''Take me out to the Holosuite'' in early February and, on February 17, he wrote so frenetically that he ended up producing ''Shadows and Symbols'', ''Afterimage'', ''Chrysalis'', ''Treachery, Faith, and the Great River'', ''Once More unto the Breach'', ''The Siege of AR-558'', ''Covenant'', ''It's only a Paper Moon'', ''Prodigal Daughter'', ''The Emperor's new Cloak'', ''Field of Fire'', ''Chimera'', ''Inter arma enim Silent Leges'', ''Badda-bing, badda-bang'', ''Penumbra'', ''Til Death do us Part'', ''Strange Bedfellows'', ''The Changing Face of Evil'', ''When it Rains...'', ''Tacking into the Wind'', ''Extreme Measures'', ''Dogs of War'' and ''What You leave Behind'', covering his cell walls entirely (SNW story [[Isolation Ward 4]]).
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=="Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited"==
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During filming of an episode titled "[[The Omega Glory]]," ''Star Trek'' actors [[William Shatner]], [[Leonard Nimoy]] and [[DeForest Kelley]] were somehow transposed through space and time to [[2268]], onto the real {{USS|Enterprise|NCC-1701}}. Kirk, [[Spock]] and [[Leonard McCoy]] were likewise transposed onto the ''Star Trek'' soundstage in Burbank. After the incident, the three actors told Roddenberry of their adventure. ({{ss|TOS|Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited}})
   
Around [[1963]], [[Gene Roddenberry]] was looking for a new idea to pitch for a television series (Historical accounts).
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==''The Motion Picture''==
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''Star Trek'' was a novel by a 23rd century author named [[Gene Roddenberry (23rd century)|Gene Roddenberry]]. It was based on the [[V'Ger]] Incident, and written at the request of [[Rear Admiral]] [[James T. Kirk]]. (''[[TOS]]'' [[novelization]]: ''[[Star Trek: The Motion Picture]]'')
   
''It is possible he found the original'' Deep Space Nine ''copy found by the son of James Wykoff, but decided that 1960s technology could not depict twenty-fourth century characters, so he chose not to use them at that time''.
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=="Make-Believe"==
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The ''Star Trek'' franchise was a favorite of [[United States Army]] pilot [[Kevin Howard]], and ''[[Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan]]'' was his favorite movie. Kevin passed his love of the show to his young son, [[Breandán Howard|Breandán]], and gave him several action figures of the original series' crew. When Kevin was sent to [[Iraq]] during the [[Iraq War|war]] with that nation in [[2003]], he told his young son Captain Kirk was sending him to fly shuttlecraft. Following his father's death, Breandán withdrew into his imagination, where Captain Kirk lead a search party for his lost father. ({{ss|TOS|Make-Believe}})
   
'Star Trek' aired it's first episode, [[The Man Trap]], on September 8, [[1966]] (Historical accounts).
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=="Getting Real"==
   
In [[1968]], during filming of [[The Omega Glory]], actors [[William Shatner]], [[Leonard Nimoy]] and [[DeForest Kelly]] were somehow transposed through space and time to [[2268]], onto the real [[USS Enterprise]]. Kirk, [[Spock]] and [[Leonard H. McCoy]] were likewise transposed onto the 'Star Trek' soundstage in [[Burbank]]. After the incident, the three actors told Roddenberry of their adventure (TOS story [[Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited]]).
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In [[2279]], the ''Enterprise'' was assigned to prevent the ''[[Icarus plague|Icarus]] ''[[Icarus plague|plague]] from killing five million people in [[1983]]. After [[time travel]]ing, [[James T. Kirk]], [[Spock]], and [[Montgomery Scott]] beamed down incognito to confirm the date. They were spotted by {{dis|Joey|1983}} and {{dis|Malcolm|1983}}, who recognized them — they were Shatner, Nimoy and [[James Doohan]] from ''Star Trek'', airing Saturdays on Channel 32. But the kids ran away when they realized Spock’s ears were real. Eventually the kids beamed up to the ''Enterprise'', where Kirk told them he would have to shoot down [[NASA|NASA’s]] manned [[space shuttle]] ''[[Icarus (space shuttle)|Icarus]]''. Malcolm became agitated, pointing out that TV’s Captain Kirk would solve the problem without killing anyone. Spock determined that they were orbiting a parallel Earth where the plague would not happen, saving the shuttle. ({{c|TOS|Getting Real}})
   
In [[1979]], Roddenberry wrote the novelisation of the first 'Star Trek' film, [[Star Trek: The Motion Picture]] (Historical accounts).
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==See also==
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* [[IDW continuity]]
At some point, Benny Russell's original story - ''Far Beyond the Stars'' - was published, although it's popularity has not been assessed (TOS novel [[The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, Volume 1]]).
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* [[Marvel continuity]]
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[[Category:Star Trek]]
In [[1984]], author [[John M. Ford]] wrote the novel [[The Final Reflection]] (Historical accounts).
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[[Category:Television series]]
 
In [[1991]], three denizens of the future transported a dying man to the future (SNW story [[The Man who Sold the Sky]])..
 
 
''Some fans believe this is Gene, being taken to the twenty-third century''.
 
 
Around January [[1992]], production began on the television series [[Star Trek: Deep Space Nine]]. The production personnel included ''New York Gazette' journalist [[J.R. Rasmussen]] (Historical accounts and SNW story [[Research]]).
 
 
In [[1993]], an incident kept quiet by the DS9 production crew resulted in the so-called fictional character [[Berlinghoff Rasmussen]]'s time-travel pod coming into the possession of the DS9 crew. They assigned J.R. Rasmussen to travel into both the past and the future, so that they could gain better insight into the events depicted in the various 'Star Trek' episodes. J.R.'s journeying to the past even included convincing Roddenberry, in 1964, to make 'Star Trek' in the first place (SNW story [[Research]]).
 
 
''It is possible that Roddenberry was still troubled by the limits of 1960s technology on the twenty-fourth century characters''.
 
 
J.R.'s travels to the future ensured that, upon each return to the present, she could tell the writers and others intricate details about the events she'd seen. Inserted into the episodes, these extra details brought about great ratings (SNW story [[Research]]).
 
 
By [[1999]], J.R. had seen too much, experienced too many dangers and felt her ''own'' writing career was suffering. As a result, she quit her association with the franchise and returned to concentrating on her journalism (SNW story [[Research]]).
 
 
In the early [[2270]]s, a man called Gene Roddenberry was asked by Kirk to write up the [[V'Ger]] Incident in narrative form. That book became known as ''Star Trek: The Motion Picture'' (TOS novelisation [[Star Trek: The Motion Picture]]).
 
 
In the [[2280]]s, McCoy convinced his friends aboard [[USS Enterprise]] that the recent novel ''The Final Reflection'', by John M. Ford, was brilliant (TOS novel [[The Final Reflection]]).
 

Revision as of 20:10, January 26, 2019

This article is about "Star Trek" in-universe. For real world information on the franchise, see Star Trek.
LA20-Poster

James T. Kirk and Spock saw themselves on a TOS poster.

A number of stories have incorporated the real-world Star Trek series into their narratives.

"Far Beyond the Stars"

Star Trek was the name given to a series of science fiction stories created by Benny Russell, a writer for Incredible Tales of Scientific Wonder Magazine in the summer of 1950. These tales were set in a fictional world of the 23rd and 24th centuries. (DS9 novelization: Far Beyond the Stars)

In September of 1953, Russell wrote his last official Star Trek story. Titled Deep Space Nine, the story was a spin-off centering around a space station commander of African descent named Benjamin Sisko. That issue ceased publication and most were pulled from the shelves by Douglas Pabst, for fear of a backlash of racism at the magazine. (DS9 episode: "Far Beyond the Stars")

After suffering from a nervous breakdown, Russell continued writing Star Trek stories while incarcerated in a mental institution. These unpublished stories include:

  • "The Emissary" (April 1954)
  • "Image in the Sand" (January 18, 1955)
  • "Take Me Out to the Holosuite" (February, 1955)
  • "Shadows and Symbols", "Afterimage", "Chrysalis", "Treachery, Faith, and the Great River", "Once More Unto the Breach", "The Siege of AR-558", "Covenant", "It's Only a Paper Moon", "Prodigal Daughter", "The Emperor's New Cloak", "Field of Fire", "Chimera", "Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges", "Badda-bing, Badda-bang", "Penumbra", "'Til Death Do Us Part", "Strange Bedfellows", "The Changing Face of Evil", "When it Rains...", "Tacking into the Wind", "Extreme Measures", "Dogs of War", "What You Leave Behind" (February 17, 1955)

These stories were pasted on his cell walls, covering them entirely. (DS9 short story: "Isolation Ward 4")

Eventually, Benny Russell's original story was published under the title Far Beyond the Stars. (TOS novel: The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh, Volume 1)

Russell's Star Trek incorporated many elements of Star Trek: The Original Series as well as Star Trek: The Next Generation, perhaps inspired by the Prophets.

The March, 1953 issue of Incredible Tales included the following stories, which may or may not be related to Russell's Star Trek:

(DS9 episode: "Far Beyond the Stars"):

"Research"

In 1964, television writer Gene Roddenberry met time travelers J. R. and Berlinghoff Rasmussen, who shared with him knowledge of the future. He used this to write the television incarnation of Star Trek.

J. R. and Berlinghoff Rasmussen later traveled to the 1980s, and used their future knowledge to provide Paramount executives with material for three Star Trek spin-offs well into the 1990s. Some time after Berlinghoff's death in 1999, J. R. left the television Star Trek franchise. (DS9 short story: "Research")

"Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited"

During filming of an episode titled "The Omega Glory," Star Trek actors William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy and DeForest Kelley were somehow transposed through space and time to 2268, onto the real USS Enterprise. Kirk, Spock and Leonard McCoy were likewise transposed onto the Star Trek soundstage in Burbank. After the incident, the three actors told Roddenberry of their adventure. (TOS short story: "Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited")

The Motion Picture

Star Trek was a novel by a 23rd century author named Gene Roddenberry. It was based on the V'Ger Incident, and written at the request of Rear Admiral James T. Kirk. (TOS novelization: Star Trek: The Motion Picture)

"Make-Believe"

The Star Trek franchise was a favorite of United States Army pilot Kevin Howard, and Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan was his favorite movie. Kevin passed his love of the show to his young son, Breandán, and gave him several action figures of the original series' crew. When Kevin was sent to Iraq during the war with that nation in 2003, he told his young son Captain Kirk was sending him to fly shuttlecraft. Following his father's death, Breandán withdrew into his imagination, where Captain Kirk lead a search party for his lost father. (TOS short story: "Make-Believe")

"Getting Real"

In 2279, the Enterprise was assigned to prevent the Icarus plague from killing five million people in 1983. After time traveling, James T. Kirk, Spock, and Montgomery Scott beamed down incognito to confirm the date. They were spotted by Joey and Malcolm, who recognized them — they were Shatner, Nimoy and James Doohan from Star Trek, airing Saturdays on Channel 32. But the kids ran away when they realized Spock’s ears were real. Eventually the kids beamed up to the Enterprise, where Kirk told them he would have to shoot down NASA’s manned space shuttle Icarus. Malcolm became agitated, pointing out that TV’s Captain Kirk would solve the problem without killing anyone. Spock determined that they were orbiting a parallel Earth where the plague would not happen, saving the shuttle. (TOS comic: "Getting Real")

See also

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