The Temporal Cold War was a protracted struggle involving several factions of time travelers, which had effects from the 20th through the 31st centuries.

The 22nd century combatants included the Suliban Cabal, as well as the United Earth Starfleet. Participants from later centuries include the Sphere Builders of the 26th century, the Order of Omega from the 28th century led by Jamran Harnoth, the Na'kuhl from the 29th century and the United Federation of Planets (in both the 29th century and 31st century) as upholders of the Temporal Accords (which effectively protected the Federation's individual history). (DTI novel: Watching the Clock)

History[edit | edit source]

Shortly after the launch of the Enterprise by the United Earth Starfleet in 2151, the ship - and hence Starfleet - became involved in the conflict, fighting against the efforts of the Suliban Cabal, especially those of Silik, a prominent Suliban. (ENT episode: "Broken Bow")

The Enterprise would continue to play a role, helping to stop unknown forces from the future from tampering with 22nd century history. Crewman Daniels, the alias of Timot Danlen, a representative of the Federation Temporal Agency from the 31st century, enlisted Captain Jonathan Archer's help in stopping the Suliban Cabal. Later Enterprise helped stop the Na'kuhl from even starting the Temporal Cold War. (ENT episode: "Storm Front"; DTI eBook: The Collectors)

The Temporal Cold War began involving the Federation again in 2410, when Tholians brought the USS Enterprise-C forward in time from the year 2344 and took it in the Azure Nebula. This temporarily created an alternate reality, until the USS Pastak, a Federation timeship from the 29th century, returned the Enterprise to its own era. (STO mission: "Temporal Ambassador")

In the 27th century, Lukari scientist Kal Dano was being pursued by a pair of Vorgon agents, who were trying to steal the quantum phase inhibitor, which they knew as the Tox Uthat. Dano escaped to the 25th century using Daniels's timeship. (STO missions: "Vorgon Conclusions", "Sunrise")

Upon his arrival in 2410, Tholians stole the inhibitor and used it to destroy the Na'kuhl star. Working with a Starfleet from that era, Dano regained the inhibitor and hid it on 22nd century Risa with a 25th century Temporal Agent, where it remained hidden until it was destroyed by Captain Jean-Luc Picard in 2366 (TNG episode: "Captain's Holiday"). When he and the Temporal Agent returned to the 25th century, the Tholians attempted to steal back the "Uthat", unaware that Dano no longer had it. during the subsequent engagement, Dano was thrust back in time, where he died at an unknown date. (ENT episode: "Future Tense", STO - Future Proof mission: "Stormbound")

Although it was believed that Picard had destroyed the Uthat, the captain transported it to Starfleet Headquarters. Using the Breen attack on Earth in 2375 as a diversion, Vorgon agents Boratus and Ajur beamed into a vault beneath Starfleet HQ in search of the Uthat. When Daniels and a starship crew from the futuer arrived, they discovered that the Vorgons were receiving help from an alien called the Envoy. The party battled the Vorgons and killed Ajur, prompting Boratus to join the Envoy's crusade against the Federation. (STO mission: "Vorgon Conclusions")

In 2769, the Temporal Accords were signed on a station in orbit of New Khitomer by representatives from the Galactic Union as a solution to the Temporal Cold War. Though recorded history indicated the Accords were signed without incident, Krenim scientist Noye launched an attack on the station, causing Captain Benjamin Walker to investigate. He and an officer from the 25th century traveled to the Kyana system in 2410, where a past version of Noye stole the KIS Annorax from a Krenim research station and escaped. A future version of Noye traveled back to 2410 and attacked the research station, before leaving into the continuum. The officer followed the Annorax into the timestream and attempted to stop him. However, the Annorax was able to escape (STO mission: "Time and Tide").

Participants[edit | edit source]

22nd century[edit | edit source]

24th century[edit | edit source]

25th century[edit | edit source]

26th century[edit | edit source]

28th century[edit | edit source]

29th century[edit | edit source]

31st century[edit | edit source]

See Also[edit | edit source]

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