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Memory Beta, non-canon Star Trek Wiki
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Memory Beta, non-canon Star Trek Wiki

A warp bubble (also known as a warp shell) is a subspace phenomenon, a disruption in normal space with subspace properties that is based on the principle used to create a warp field. While a warp field radiates and dissipates, a warp bubble can hold its shape, but eventually becomes unstable and collapses inward. (ST reference: USS Enterprise Owners' Workshop Manual)

In 2366, Wesley Crusher conducted an experiment generating a static warp bubble, which accidentally trapped his mother, Dr. Beverly Crusher, in an alternate dimension of her own inadvertent creation. (TNG episode: "Remember Me")

In 2377, after the USS da Vinci had been transported to an alternate dimension by Rod Portlyn, chief engineer Nancy Conlon proposed using a static warp bubble in a similar way to return to their dimension. This idea was ultimately deemed impractical, as there was no way to control the dimension they would travel to. (CoE eBook: The Art of the Comeback)


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